logo
Food Advertising by

RHUBARB JAM DOORSTOPPERS

I liked the idea of making a Jam. I’ve never ever done it before, I always put it in the same category as making a wedding cake. It’s seemed time-consuming, something I don’t ever seem to have. But when I was thinking about what I was going to make I really felt like smearing some jam on a doorstopper slice of fresh white bread, (this might be, in part, due to early pregnancy) and I couldn’t get it out of my head, so Jam it has to be. So here goes….an amateur jam maker takes her first step.
Rhubarb has inspired a number festivals around the world. The one that took my fancy was the Whoop-Up Days and Rhubarb Festival in Conrad, Montana. You take in a rodeo whilst eating rhubarb pies. Yum!

Normally, I end up having to remake a lot of my recipes or as the experts say, triple test, as I tend to think I can walk before I can crawl. I’m always adding or reducing ingredients, when I haven’t even tried out the original. I just can’t help myself, and my jam making wasn’t any different. Thankfully, it seems to be quite forgiving to my creative experiments.

Making jam was pretty easy, however I did burn my pot, and no amount of scrubbing or hot water seems to be resurrecting it (so don’t have your element on high, medium heat is fine as long as its bubbling away). I was also blown away by the amount of sugar – sometimes being ignorant when your smearing jam on your toast for breakfast, is how I want to be. But sugar never-the-less, is what you need to make jam, and lots and lots of it. But I was really impressed with the results, and I plan to try out some more soon, I’m thinking grapefruit marmalade.
Do you remember the children’s book The Giant Jam Sandwich?

 

 

Rhubarb, Ginger and Lemon Jam

Takes around 40mins
Makes five to six jars
What you need
800g rhubarb (chop stalk into small chunks, discard leaves as they are toxic)
650ml water – this makes for a sticky thick jam, add more water for thinner consistency.
1.5kg sugar
2Tbsp root ginger (grated or squeezed through a garlic press)
1 lemon (juice and grated rind)

How to make

In a large pot, add rhubarb and water. Boil covered for 10mins until rhubarb softens. Add sugar, stir to dissolve.  Boil on medium heat until setting point. Add ginger and lemon and stir through. My jam took 35mins. I tested it by putting a plate in the freezer for five mins, then adding a spoonful of jam, and putting back in the freezer and seeing if it sets. Skim foam off the top. When cool, pour into jars.
When Vanessa tried this jam, she wanted to put it on crackers with blue cheese, so use this jam for savoury and sweet.

This jam is great added to sweet short pastry parcels, check out https://www.foodopera.blogspot.co.nz/2012/01/stone-fruit.html

Boysenberry and Rhubarb Jam 
Takes 50mins
Makes five to six jars
What you need
800g Rhubarb (chop stalk into small chunks, discard leaves as they are toxic)
500mls water
1 can of boysenberries (425g)
1.5kg sugar
How to make
In a large pot, add rhubarb and water. Boil covered for 10mins until rhubarb softens. Add boysenberries, and sugar, stir to dissolve.  Boil on medium heat until setting point. My jam took 35mins. I tested it by putting a plate in the freezer for five mins, then adding a spoonful of jam, and putting back in the freezer and seeing if it sets. Skim foam off the top. When cool, pour into jars.
This jam wasn’t as thick as the rhubarb, ginger and lemon, I’m guessing because it had more water content with the can of boysenberries, but the berries gave it a beautiful rich crimson colour, and it had the more traditional jam flavour.
Enjoy, Ingrid

Comments (1)

 

One Response

  1. Now I know what to do with my Rhubarb, thanks for introducing me to your fabulous Blog, love the cafe info too. Keep up the good work.
    Yolly

Leave a Reply